Palatine Hill, Roman Forum, Domus Aurea & Convento Bonaventura (Rome - Italy)

From Colosseum & Arch of Constantine, I walked over to Palatine Hill. As I mentioned about this issue in my post on Copenhagen, almost each and every city in every European Nation, went through more than one major fire outbreak. 
Rome went through it in 64 CE and that happened here in Domus Aurea and Palatine Hill very close to where Emperor Nero's palace was situated. Originally, till 10 C BCE this place was used as a burial ground and the surrounding places as a residential area with remain of huts, ceramics etc. This is a trapezoidal area and was created as a business & market place.
By 509 BCE, this was a temple of Saturn, Castor & Pollux. By 2nd C CE, 4 basilicas were built here. It was on a portion of this area that the Colosseum was built. Just after that in 135 CE, the Temples for Venus an Rome were built. Much later during the period of Augustus Ceaser, this was expanded vastly with several monuments & marble flooring etc. The last construction that took place here was the columns of Emperor Phocas in 604 CE. 

Just like Colosseum, I opted not to go inside this as well. However since this has a low fencing, it was possible to observe a lot from the outside itself!
A walk on the Via Sacra took me to this arch called Titus Arch. This was built by Emperor Domitian in the memory of his brother Titus in 81 CE. Though this too looks similar to Arch of Constantine, this is in a much more in a worse condition. This too has inscription and relief sculptures.
The view from here was spectacular with the Temple of Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, followed by Santi Luca e Martina and then the backview of the Altar of the Fatherland. Further beyond this was the quaint little church called Convento S Bonaventura built in 17th C CE. 

Exploring the whole place, I missed quite a lot of places too. I guess just this area needs alteast 3 days to have a superficial look of all the spots. One of the most important places I missed is the Trojan Column, an impeccably sculpted huge pillar, an important topic in art history. I've had a look at the life size replica in V&A Museum in London, though. This is located further ahead of the Altar of the Fatherland. 
Other places I missed in this vicinity incl Pantheon, Temple of Ceaser, other side of Domus Aurea, Spanish Steps, Castel Sant'Angelo, Trajan's Market, Palazzo Valentini, Turtle Fountain, Piazza Venezia and the list would just go on & on.

To Get There:
Nearest Metro Station: Colosseo
Entry Ticket to Palatine Hill (combined with Colosseum): €12.00
Free entry during first Sunday of every month.

Here are some tips:
There are way too many sites that sell tickets for entry and I had a tough time to figure out which is real and which is fake, so let me make your life easier - Official Colosseum Tickets by CoopCulture
At any given point of time there can only 3000 people inside the monument so its pretty much impossible to get the ticket there. So pre-book as early as possible.
Palatine hill is in ruins and totally uneven flooring. So footwear has to be sturdy enough to take the toll.
Check out more tips on this locality in my earlier post.

Bhushavali N

An ardent traveler by passion. I am a wanderlust.. Read more about me here.

32 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tour. It's a long time since I was in Rome so it was good to see it again.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I had done the tour of these places. We got a combined ticket for all these. Metro service is too good and we could cover so much in one day. It was a bit hurried though. 3 days should be comfortable.

    ReplyDelete
  3. We love Rome!! It was the first international destination for the kids. So much history and art and culture...and of course...gelato!! The kids had a ball and we so want to go back. Love your photos. They are great for daydreaming!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Rome just offers so may things to see and do and the entire city is basically an attraction in itself. It's almost unfathomable to think of the amount of history that occurred there and really, the remains of the Colosseum and these temples should really act as a reminder that empires can and do fall, even which they are so apparently mighty. Great post and thoroughly enjoyed

    ReplyDelete
  5. Rome as a historical city is very intriguing and fascinating. We missed this one during our visit to Rome. We visited Colosseum twice and could see most of the Palatine hill from the streets as you said which did not pique much of our interest. Thanks for this post we could get a fair insight into Palatine hill and its history.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Rome is so interesting. I would love to explore it someday. Mostly people talk about the already known monuments of Rome. Glad you wrote about this place. So many interesting stories behind one monument. Impressive.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Rome is such a fascinated place with all this old history and ruins thats left for us to explore.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I visited these places myself but, without a guide and with very little interest in the history (I was 20 years old and super immature!), I had no idea about the origins and everything. So it was really interesting to read a little bit about it from you. Did you go with a tour guide or was it a sort of DIY guidebook job?

    ReplyDelete
  9. The view from the Palatine Hill is indeed spectacular! I spent two days in this area when I was in Rome and I feel I didn't really see everything. And the Trajan Column is certainly worth a look. Those Roman emperors knew how to build things for sure!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I was supposed to be in Rome for a couple of days the last week. Now after reading this, I regret of not having gone. :( This really is a lovely place. I hope to make it to Rome soon.

    ReplyDelete
  11. The Roman Forum is a paradise for architecture lovers. Since most of it is in ruins, I kept trying to imagine the original construction, to get a more accurate feel of the grandeur. The view from the hill is fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
  12. There is something painfully beautiful about Rome, history lives in each building and stories are etched in stone. While the colosseum is a major tourist delight I got a very uncomfortable, eerie feeling there. Knowing the bloody history and tragic deaths of the gladiators there.

    ReplyDelete
  13. If I remember it right we got the combination ticket at the entry. The trick is not to go on the weekend and to be there really early in the morning =) I just loved all the ruins and it was by far one of my favorite spots...touristy yes, but still just breathing the roman spirit^^

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks for the tips. Next time in Rome I will check it out.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Rome is so incredibly rich in ancient history. I loved that I had a guide who was able to explain it all to me as I ventured from one landmark to the next.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your post reminded me of my last visit to Rome a few years ago. very nice photographs, these places make one realize how we are linked to our history!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I am so glad you covered the not so "world famous" corner of Rome! This is one of those cities in the world where I definitely need more than a couple of weeks to explore the place completely.

    ReplyDelete
  18. YOu know....this post is making me feel really jealous right now. I so wanted to walk around the Roman forum but had to pick between the Colosseum and this owing to shortage of time. I so missed out on these lovely sights. Well, at least I got a virtual tour here!

    ReplyDelete
  19. The place looks really ancient, I'm starting to review some of my Roman knowledge, but then I only have few related myth which are almost the same with the Greek Mythology.

    ReplyDelete
  20. RBhushavali, it is really interesting the way you find and write about the history of each monument, tombs, pillars, sculptures etc. Rome has always fascinated me. I will love to go and check it myself. Thanks for sharing this.

    ReplyDelete
  21. The place really gives you a glimpse of the early centuries. Touring it really gives you a place a lesson on history and appreciation of their architecture.

    ReplyDelete
  22. This is so beautiful and love the architecture this place has got and so much to capture thru lens.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I have never been to Rome and i can't even say why; it's seems to be a logical destination when you live in Europe, doesn't it? However, I find it really interesting that every big city seems to have an Arche somewhere.. Seems to be a thing :D

    ReplyDelete
  24. Thanks for sharing, it brought back some wonderful memories :) I lived in northern Italy for most of last year, and loved visiting Rome :) So much history there!

    ReplyDelete
  25. It never ceases to impress me to see that something built centuries ago remains an attraction and that some facades remain intact.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Seeing the Coliseum and Titus Arch reminded us of the movie Gladiator. This is such an amazing place. Hopefully, more than just the carefully preserved ruins, we will have a chance to visit Rome for this is an important place that shaped our world's history.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Wow, I didn't know there was more to see within the Palatine Hills area. We definitely need to return to Rome one day to explore it in more detail.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Wow! So many places to visit in Rome, Italy. You're so well-traveled! Since I haven't been there yet and it's one of those dream destinations I have, I'm thankful about the tips you shared towards the end. I guess I really have to plan a trip here so well like you did so I can be sure to get tickets to places I wanna see. :)

    ReplyDelete
  29. This place and the city are definitely on my bucket list. I would love to spend there at least couple of weeks so I can thoroughly explore all the cool places. This post makes me want to travel there right now!

    ReplyDelete
  30. This looks like it was a really great tour. I have never made it to Rome, or Italy for that matter, but its nice to see a different side of the place. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Rome is just a heartthrob destination. It's an open air museum and quite honestly Romans a very friendly! Thanks a lot for making me discover this cool tour!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Wow, 3 days just for a superficial look? I wonder if this is even bigger than the forbidden palace in China~ I was more keen on Greek than Rome history, but this got me intrigued~

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for visiting...!
Why not leave a comment.?
And tell your friends..!!!

cookieassistant.com